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Thanksgiving is the leading day for home cooking fires

Three times as many cooking fires occur on Thanksgiving than on an average day

November 19, 2014 – Cooking is, and has long been, the leading cause of home structure fires and home fire injuries, and according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), home cooking fires peak on major U.S. holidays that traditionally include cooking such as Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Easter.

NFPA’s 2013 “Home Fires Involving Cooking Equipment” report states that in 2011, Thanksgiving was the leading day for home cooking fires, with three times as many fires occurring on this holiday as any average day of the year. In 2011, there were 1,210 fires on Thanksgiving, a 183 percent increase over the daily average.

“Thanksgiving is a fun and festive holiday, but it can also be very hectic,” said Lorraine Carli, vice president of Outreach and Advocacy for NFPA. “Hosting and entertaining guests can cause distractions and it’s easy to forget about what’s cooking in the oven and on the stovetop.”

NFPA’s “Kitchen for Trouble” video stars cartoon character Dan Doofus. Dan has to learn the hard way how to prevent cooking fires.

 

 

Overall, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated average of 156,600 home fires involving cooking equipment from 2007 – 2011 per year. These fires caused an annual average of 400 civilian deaths, 5,080 civilian injuries and $853 million in direct property damage.

“By recognizing the risks of the holidays and making simple adjustments, however, people can greatly reduce their chance of home cooking fires,” said Carli.

In the “Thanksgiving Fire Safety Tips” video, NFPA’s Lisa Braxton discusses a few simple measures to help ensure a safer Thanksgiving Day.

Keep an eye on what you fry. Always stay in the kitchen while frying, grilling or broiling food. If you have to leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.
  • Keep things that can catch fire such as oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels and curtains away from the cooking area.

  • Be alert when cooking. If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol, don’t use the stove or stovetop.

If you have a small (grease) cooking fire and decide to fight the fire:

  • On the stovetop, smother the flames by sliding a lid over the pan and turning off the burner. Leave the pan covered until it is completely cooled.
  • For an oven fire, turn off the heat and keep the door closed.

If you have any doubt about fighting a small fire:

  • Just get out! When you leave, close the door behind you to help contain the fire.
  • Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number from outside the home.

NFPA also discourages the use of turkey fryers, a popular cooking method on Thanksgiving. The use of turkey fryers can lead to devastating burns and other injuries, and the destruction of property due to the large amount and high temperature of oil used. NFPA urges those who prefer fried turkey to look for grocery stores, specialty food retailers and restaurants that sell deep fried turkeys. Find more information about the dangers of turkey fryers on NFPA’s cooking equipment safety webpage. A turkey fryer safety tips sheet is also available to download.

Additional resources for Thanksgiving and other cooking safety tips can be found on NFPA’s Cooking Fire Safety Central webpage. Download NFPA’s cooking safety tips sheet, smoke alarms and cooking infographic, and cooking safety infographic for easy access and to share with family and friends.

About the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
NFPA is a worldwide leader in fire, electrical, building, and life safety. The mission of the international nonprofit organization founded in 1896 is to reduce the worldwide burden of fire and other hazards on the quality of life by providing and advocating consensus codes and standards, research, training, and education. NFPA develops more than 300 codes and standards to minimize the possibility and effects of fire and other hazards. All NFPA codes and standards can be viewed at no cost at www.nfpa.org/freeaccess.

RSS Subscribe to NFPA RSS News feeds

Contact: Lorraine Carli, Public Affairs Office: +1 617 984-7275

 

Keep your family safe with a working smoke alarm in every bedroom.

Did you know that roughly half of home fire deaths result from fires reported between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m., when most people are asleep?

Smoke alarms save lives. If there is a fire in your home, smoke spreads fast and you need smoke alarms to give you time to get out. In fact, having a working smoke alarm cuts the chances of dying in a reported fire in half!

 


 

Now Check Us Out On You Tube

http://www.youtube.com/user/763firefighter

A Safety Reminder from

Summer season: peak time for grilling fires

As the warmer temperatures are upon us, backyard chefs everywhere are dusting off their grills, eager to spring into the long-awaited barbeque season. Holding a barbecue should be a safe and fun experience for everyone. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) recommends that grillers pay particular attention to safety in the spring and summer months when home fires involving grilling incidents occur most often.

Three out of five households own a gas grill, which translates to a lot of tasty meals. But it also means there’s an increased risk of home fires. Each year an average of 8,800 home fires are caused by grilling, and close to half of all injuries involving grills are due to thermal burns. While nearly half of the people who grill do so year-round, July is the peak month for grilling fires followed by May, June and August.


While gas grills contribute to a higher number of home fires overall than their charcoal counterparts, everyone needs to be reminded that all types of grills pose a risk for fires and burn injuries. More than one-quarter (27 percent) of home structure grill fires started on a courtyard, terrace or patio, while 29 percent started on an exterior balcony or open porch, and six percent began in the kitchen.

“As we get outdoors to enjoy the warmer temperatures, grilling will become more active. Be sure your grill is working properly and review safety tips,” advises Tom Bowden, President of the Wicomico County Fire Chiefs Association. “It’s good practice to check for damage before using the grill for the first time each year. Propane gas hose leaks or breaks were the leading factors contributing to gas grill fires. Along with checking for hose damage, clean and check the entire grill regularly.” 


When grilling, the following safety tips are recommended:

  • Propane and charcoal BBQ grills should only be used outdoors. Never use a barbecue indoors or in tents. This is a dangerous fire hazard and can cause high levels of carbon monoxide.
  • The grill should be placed well away from the home, deck railings and out from under eaves and overhanging branches.
  • Keep children, pets, and outdoor games at least three feet away from the grill area.
  • Use long-handled grilling tools to give the chef plenty of clearance from heat and flames
  • Keep your grill clean by removing grease or fat buildup from the grates and in the trays below.
  • Never leave your grill unattended.
  • Allow the barbecue to cool before attempting to move it.

 

This safety reminder brought to you by the Wicomico County Fire Chiefs Association.

 

 

Wicomico County Fire Chiefs Association

MOVE OVER when you see stopped Emergency Vehicles.

Let emergency responders do their job safely along the roadways. State law requires motorists to change lanes away from an emergency vehicle if approaching It from the rear if the lane change is not possible, please reduce speed to ensure the safety of the emergency services personnel working close to traffic. Protect those who protect you. For further details of the law, contact your local police agency or go to www.moveoveramerica.com

 

MOVE OVER !!!

CHANGE LANES WHEN APPROACHING STOPPED EMERGENCY VEHICLES.

 

 

 

PITTSVILLE VOL. FIRE DEPT.

PRESENTS

BEFORE THE FIRE PROGRAM

The Members and Officers of the Pittsville Volunteer Fire Dept. have acknowledged and recognized that Fire Prevention shouldn't just be recognized one week out of the year, in fact it needs to be recognized every day throughout the year. We would like to offer our services to you by conducting a check of your smoke alarms which will include checking the following...

  • BATTERY

  • LOCATION

  • CONDITION

WE WILL ALSO REPLACE AND OR INSTALL NEW SMOKE DETECTORS AND OR BATTERY'S IF NEEDED FOR FREE. THIS SERVICE IS FREE TO OUR COMMUNITY. HOWEVER DONATIONS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME.

ONCE A MONTH THE MEMBERS AND OFFICERS OF THE FIRE DEPT WILL BE GOING AROUND DIFFERENT AREAS OF OUR COMMUNITY, (DOOR TO DOOR) AND FIRE DISTRICT TO PROVIDE THIS SERVICE. HOWEVER IF YOU  KNOW OR THINK THAT YOU ARE IN NEED OF A SMOKE DETECTOR PLEASE CALL THE FIRE DEPT. AT, (410) 835-2323 OR SEND AN E-MAIL AT SMOKEALARM@PITTSVILLEFIRE.COM

 

 HELP FULL TIPS

  • SMOKE ALARMS SHOULD BE REPLACED EVERY 10 YEARS

  • BATTERIES REPLACED AT LEAST ONCE A YEAR

  • TESTED A MINIMUM OF ONCE A MONTH

The Men and Women of the department look forward to assisting you and hope that you will welcome this program and the department into your home, to help fight against the possibility of preventable tragedy by not having a working smoke detector . Thank you and we look forward to seeing you soon.

 

 

 

 



News Headlines
Tue. Feb 17th 2015
More than 2,500 fire deaths occur throughout the U.S. each year. Eight out of ten of those fire deaths resulted from home fires. In Maryland, during 2014, 49 fire deaths occurred in one and two family homes out of the reported 63 total fire deaths recorded in the state. “Most home fire deaths ...
Tue. Jan 20th 2009
 WE WOULD LIKE TO MAKE AN IMPORTANT STATEMENT.  USING KEROSENE OR ELECTRIC HEATERS CAN BE DANGEROUS. YOU MUST USE CAUTION WHEN USING THEM. IF YOU FIND THAT YOU HAVE NO CHOICE BUT TO USE THESE METHODS OF HEAT WE URGE YOU TO PROTECT YOURSELF AND LOVED ONES BY USING SMOKE AND CARBON MONO...
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Pittsville Fire Department Inc.
P.O. Box 387
Pittsville Maryland 21850
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